Pet Dental Health

Thanks to Pet Tech Australia for this guest blog post…

Pet Dental Health

August is Pet Dental Health month, and we at Pet Tech Australia would like to encourage all pet owners to take an active role in caring for their pets’ dental health, not just this month, but all year long.

Did you know that dental health can affect your pet’s heart, liver, kidneys and other major organs? It’s true – in fact, scientific studies have shown a link between dental health and overall health many times over. Here is some of the science behind that link: bacteria grow best in a warm, moist environment. For that reason, bacteria grow very well in a pet’s mouth (or a human’s, for that matter). If those bacteria are able to enter the bloodstream, they have a direct route to the heart, kidneys, liver and other major organs, and are able to cause damage. Since gum disease is characterised by “bleeding at the gum line”, this gives those bacteria access into the bloodstream!

To prevent the above scenario, it is advisable that you take steps to ensure that your pet has good dental health. Check your pet’s teeth and gums. Are the teeth nice and white and clean? Are the gums nice and pink and firm? Is there any bad odor? If your pet’s teeth and gums are not in good shape, you may want to start becoming proactive in looking after their dental health. Here are some useful tips:

  • Raw bones (of appropriate size and shape) are very useful in helping a pet maintain dental health
  • Dental toys (with raised “nubs”) can also help, and are also good for mental stimulation
  • You can also brush your pet’s teeth (Yes, really!). There are some excellent video tutorials available online.
  • There are also gels available which do not require brushing to reduce plaque and tartar.
  • If your pet’s dental health is suffering, please make an appointment with your vet, who can offer a thorough dental cleaning.

Your pet’s dental health can have a huge impact on the quality (and quantity) of his life. It can also affect the amount that you pay in vet bills over time, so it’s a great idea for you to take an active role in looking after your pet’s teeth and gums.

 

 

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9 comments

  1. I regularly clean my dogs’ teeth. I felt so proud when the vet recently congratulated me on the state of my 9.y.o’s teeth! I used to attempt to also clean one of my cats teeth, but gave up after a while! She had other ideas, so I just increased the wings and necks.

  2. Hi Jo,

    I found this blog post quite interesting.

    I did not realise the proven scientific link between poor dental health and other health problems.

    Although I do not own a pet it has made me start to wonder about my own teeth!

    Thanks for your post.

    Tristan

Thanks for reading my blog. I look forward to reading your comments, Jo